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CHLORINE TASTE & ODOR

CHLORAMINE FILTRATION

Chloramines are disinfection byproducts that can damage commercial food service equipment through corrosion, deterioration of rubber and plastic components, and other negative effects. Implementing proper water filtration that is certified for Chloramine reduction, conducting regular maintenance, and testing your water for excessive chloramines can help mitigate these issues and ensure the longevity and efficiency of your food service equipment.

While chloramines can effectively disinfect water, they can also pose problems, especially in commercial food service equipment.

WHAT ARE CHLORAMINES?

 

Chloramines have been in widespread use in the municipal water supply since the mid-20th century. The adoption of chloramines as a disinfection method gained momentum in the United States and other parts of the world during the 1940s and 1950s with wide-spread adoption in the last decade of the previous century.

One of the key reasons for the increased use of chloramines was the concern over the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) when using free chlorine for water disinfection. Chlorination, which involves adding free chlorine to water, can lead to the formation of potentially harmful DBPs, such as haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs), when chlorine reacts with organic matter present in the water.

Chloramines offered an alternative disinfection approach that reduced the chemical cost to municipalities and resulted in lower levels of certain DBPs compared to the use of free chlorine. This made chloramines an attractive option for municipal water treatment systems seeking to balance effective disinfection with reduced DBP formation as well as shrinking budgets.

The transition to using chloramines in water treatment involved careful consideration of factors such as dosing methods, ammonia addition, residual maintenance, and potential impacts on distribution systems.

 

Regulatory agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), established guidelines and regulations for the use of chloramines to ensure their safe and effective application in municipal water supplies. While chloramines can effectively disinfect water, they can also pose problems, especially in commercial food service equipment.

HOW MIGHT CHLORAMINES DAMAGE COMMERCIAL FOOD SERVICE EQUIPMENT?

 

Chloramines can damage commercial food service equipment in several ways:

CORROSION

 

Chloramines are much more corrosive than free chlorine. When water containing chloramine encounters metal surfaces in equipment like ice machines, coffee makers, steamers, and dishwashers, it can accelerate the corrosion of metal components, including pipes, valves, heating elements, boilers, evaporators, fittings, and any metal surfaces. This corrosion can lead to leaks, breakdowns, and costly repairs or premature replacements.

RUBBER AND PLASTIC DEGRADATION

Chloramines can also degrade rubber seals, gaskets, and plastic parts found in equipment. Over time, exposure to chloramine-containing water can cause rubber components to become brittle, crack, or deteriorate, leading to equipment malfunctions and leaks.

REDUCED LIFESPAN

 

The corrosive and deteriorative effects of chloramines can significantly shorten the lifespan of commercial food service equipment. Equipment that is exposed to this water regularly may require more frequent maintenance and replacement, resulting in higher operating costs.

FLAVOR AND ODOR IMPACT

 

In some cases, chloramines can impart an unpleasant taste or odor to food and beverages. This can affect the quality and presentation of the final products, which is particularly problematic in food service settings where taste and appearance are crucial.

REDUCED EFFICIENCY

 

The buildup of scale, rust, and other debris caused by chloramine-related corrosion can decrease the efficiency of equipment. This can lead to longer operating times, increased energy consumption, and decreased output capacity.

Ensure Chloramine Filters are Tested and Certified by Reputable Organizations.

MITIGATING DAMAGE CAUSED BY CHLORAMINES

To prevent chloramine-related damage to commercial food service equipment, it's important to consider the following measures:

PROPER WATER TREATMENT FOR CHLORAMINES

  1. Look for chloramine water filters that are tested and certified by reputable organizations, such as NSF International, to ensure that they meet established standards for Chloramine reduction. Depending on the equipment's requirements, catalytic carbon filters or systems specifically designed to remove chloramines might be needed.
     

  2. Implement filtration systems that can effectively remove chloramines and other contaminants from the water supply before it reaches the equipment. In some instances, it may be necessary to size the water treatment manifold with multiple cartridges to ensure that contact time is maximized to adequately reduce Chloramine. Check the NSF performance data for your application.

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REGULAR EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

Conduct regular inspections and maintenance of equipment to detect and address any signs of corrosion, deterioration, or leaks. Proper maintenance can extend the lifespan of the equipment and minimize unexpected breakdowns.

PERIODICALLY TEST FOR CHLORAMINES

 

Periodically test the water, both incoming and post treatment, for the presence of chloramines and other contaminants. This will help you adjust your water treatment strategies accordingly and ensure proper functioning of your equipment.

HOW DO CERTIFIED CHLORAMINE FILTERS WORK?

 

ACTIVATED CARBON FILTRATION

Activated carbon is the primary filtration medium used in chloramine water filters. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area that can adsorb a wide range of contaminants, including chloramines.

ADSORPTION OF CHLORAMINES

 

As water flows through the activated carbon filter, the porous structure of the carbon attracts and captures chloramine molecules. The chloramines become trapped within the carbon's pores, effectively removing them from the water. Due to its high degree of microporosity, one gram of activated carbon has a surface area in excess of 32,000 sq ft!

CATALYTIC CARBON

 

WaterWise Chloramine (CLO) water filters use catalytic carbon, which has been treated to enhance its ability to remove chloramines. Catalytic carbon can break down chloramine molecules into harmless components through a catalytic reaction, improving the filter's efficiency in chloramine removal.

COMBINATION FILTERS

 

WaterWise filters designed to remove chloramines use a variety of substrates and media. This includes layers of different types of activated carbon, along with other media that target specific contaminants. The combined action of these filtration media provides comprehensive water treatment.

PRE--FILTRATION

In some cases, we recommend pre-filtration to remove larger particles and sediment from the water before it reaches the activated carbon. This prevents clogging and maximizes the effectiveness of the chloramine removal process. Chloramine cartridges are particularly susceptible to clogging as they are typically sub-micron cartridges and the composition of the media (catalytic carbon, etc…) make them more expensive than standard water treatment cartridges.

Glasses of Water

REGULAR REPLACEMENT OF CHLORAMINE FILTERS

 

Over time, the activated carbon in the filter becomes saturated with contaminants, reducing its ability to adsorb chloramines effectively. Regular replacement of the filter cartridge is necessary to maintain optimal performance.

FLOW RATE AND CONTACT TIME IN CHLORAMINE FILTRATION

 

It is imperative to maintain the prescribed maximum flow rates and therefore contact time with the filtration media to ensure effective reduction of Chloramine and mitigation of the damaging effects of Chloramine on food service equipment. Adequate contact time allows the activated catalytic carbon to capture and adsorb chloramines from the water.

 

Chloramines are disinfection byproducts that can damage commercial food service equipment through corrosion, deterioration of rubber and plastic components, and other negative effects. Implementing proper water filtration that is certified for Chloramine reduction, conducting regular maintenance, and testing your water for excessive chloramines can help mitigate these issues and ensure the longevity and efficiency of your food service equipment.

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To locate an authorized service dealer, or order replenishment cartridges, please contact us today via our website or call 866.551.0510

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